GOULBURN VALLEY REINING HORSE ASSOCIATION
What is REINING?

WHAT IS REINING?

What is REINING?

As quoted from the National Reining Horse Association rulebook, "To rein a horse is not only to guide him, but to control his every movement...". 

Reining is a judged event designed to show the athletic ability of a ranch type horse in the confines of a show arena. In NRHA competition, contestants are required to run one of ten approved patterns. Each pattern includes small slow circles, large fast circles, flying lead changes, rollbacks over the hocks, repeated 360 degree spins done in place, and exciting sliding stops that are the hallmark of the reining horse.

The attraction of reining involves speed, precision, and unity of horse and rider.  While reining is somewhat similar to dressage in its level of finesse while performing a pattern, the added elements of speed and riding one handed on a loose rein make for a much higher degree of difficulty.  And while great reining competition is often fast and thrilling, the level of discipline involved in a well-executed reining pattern is not found in any other equine speed event. 

Reining is truly unlike any other horse sport in the world.  It is thrilling to watch, but an especially incomparable experience from the back of a well trained reining horse.

What is the NRHA?

Founded in 1966, the National Reining Horse Association (NRHA) is an organization dedicated to the promotion of the reining horse.  The National Reining Horse Association is the governing body of the sport of reining responsible for enforcing the standards of competition, promoting the sport, and educating its members and the general public about the proper performance of the reining horse in the show arena.

Reining is the fastest growing equine sport in the world.  The membership of NRHA has grown by 300% in the past 12 years, and the number of approved reining events more than tripled in that time.  As of 2005, NRHA has grown to over 13,500 members worldwide, sanctioned over 575 events in th

 

 

Reining is a judged event designed to show the athletic ability of a ranch type horse within the confines of a show arena. In NRHA competition, contestants are required to run one of ten approved patterns, included in the NRHA Handbook.

Each pattern includes small slow circles, large fast circles, flying lead changes, roll backs over the hocks, 360 degree spins done in place, and exciting sliding stops that are the hallmark of the reining horse.

The NRHA Judging System is recognized as the leading format for judging an equine event that combines technical and stylistic elements coupled with consideration of "degree of difficulty". Many segments of the equine judging discipline have openly embraced the NRHA Judging System.

 

NRHA offers the following approved divisions in competition:
 

  • Open
  • Intermediate Open
  • Limited Open
  • Rookie Level 1 & 2
  • Non Pro
  • Intermediate Non Pro
  • Limited Non Pro
  • Prime Time Non Pro
  • Rookie
  • Snaffle Bit
  • Novice Horse Open Level 1 & 2
  • Novice Horse Non Pro Level 1 & 2
  • Youth 14-18
  • Youth 13 & Under
  • Youth 10 & Under Short Stirrup
  • Unrestricted Youth
  • Freestyle

(reference: NRHA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

NRHA 2013 PATTERN BOOK

Click filename below to access file

handbook.pdf

GVRHA MODIFIED REINING PATTERNS

Click filename below to access file

8A_6A_5A_patterns.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Show Etiquette

 

1.     Pen rules.  Each club may have slightly different rules about how you behave in the open pen, so it is important to ask a local or observe before you go in, but in general; right circles at the top of the pen, left circles the bottom, slower moving riders to go in the centre of the circle (so that riders can lope fast circles), no stopping and standing in the centre – move slightly to off-centre so that circling riders can still circle.  Circling will usually go for about 20- 30 minutes and then the riders will move to do run-downs.  Run straight down the pen, rather than at diagonal angles.  Open pens may be limited in the number of horses permitted at one time.

2.     Before you show.  If you are entering sanctioned classes, you will need to have a your NRHA membership and horses NRHA licence number.

3.     Show attire.  The NRHA Handbook outlines the attire required for showing; when you enter the arena to show, you must be wearing a western hat or safety hat, long sleeved western shirt with sleeves buttoned down and boots and your horse must have a western saddle and western bridle.  Failure to have correct attire upon entering the arena will result in a no score, however losing your hat within a run does not attract a penalty.

4.     Number.  Failing to wear your show number can result in a $25 fine.  Pin your number to your saddle pad on the left hand side.  It is also permitted to pin it to your shirt.

5.     Presentations.  Again, each club will do presentations a little differently but in general (and at larger shows), you need to be astride your saddled horse and wearing a Western hat for presentations.

6.     Animal welfare.  Whilst the RA Board does not feel that there are any problems with animal abuse or welfare in reining in Australia overall, this is a gentle reminder to be very mindful of your behaviour with your horse in any public environment.  Many people are not familiar with western riding/attire and may not understand the appearance and use of spurs or western bits.  Animal welfare groups are becoming more and more active and it is necessary to be very mindful of this – something that you may not take offense at, they may!  It is also good to remember that most mobile phones have video capability now, so you may be recorded without your knowledge – this is especially the case with trainers – many people may be recording your schooling.

"REINING - A SPORT YOU CAN SLIDE RIGHT INTO"

Updated by Michelle McDonald